How to Grow Skullcap | Guide to Growing Skullcap

How to Grow Skullcap | Guide to Growing Skullcap  



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Skullcap was well known among the Cherokee and other Native American healers as a strong emmenagogue and female medicinal herb. Today Skullcap is recognized as a powerful medicinal herb, used in alternative medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, slightly astringent, emmenagogue, febrifuge, nervine, sedative and tonic.


Perennial (zones 4-8)

7 to 14 days

2 years

Well-drained, fertile soil

Partial shade, full sun

Flowers, aerial parts

12" apart

120-124 days

Growing Guide
Skullcap Grows to a height of 8-24" and produces bright blue flowers. The genus Scutelleria is named for the shape of the calyx of the flower which resembles a small cap.


Skullcap prefers partial shade to full sun. Water moderately, but make sure soil is well-drained. Prefers fertile soil.

Skullcap seeds will germinate at a high rate naturally, and does better with a short period of stratification (1 week or so). Seeds can be placed into refrigerator for one week, then started by lightly tamping seeds into soil in flats (1/4-3/8" deep) or similar starting container. Transplant outdoors when first true leaves are developed.


Harvesting Guide
Aerial parts, including the flowers and leaves, should be harvested when flowers are in full bloom. To harvest, use a scissors or shears and leave around 3" of growth.



NOTE Should be used with some caution since in overdose it causes giddiness, stupor, confusion and twitching. Skullcap has been linked to liver damage, though it is suspected that the source of damage was actually from Germander being substituted for Skullcap. Use in moderation and avoid if you have liver problems.


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