How to Grow Licorice | Guide to Growing Licorice

 
How to Grow Licorice | Guide to Growing Licorice  

Overview

 
 

Seed Starting Guide

Seed Starting A-Z

Calendar

Transplanting

Videos

Growing Guides

Growing Vegetables

Growing Herbs

Growing Tomatoes

Seed Saving

 

Organic Vegetable Gardening

Urban

Garden Zones

Tips

Greenhouse

Container Gardening

Natural Pest Control

Companion

A-Z Pests

Sprays

Beneficial Pests

 
 
   
 

Licorice has long been appreciated as a flavoring in confections, liqueurs and other creations. It's use as a flavorful tea goes back even farther. Licorice tea does not taste exactly like the black licorice sticks you might remember from childhood. That's because most licorice candy is usually flavored with anise.

 
   
 

Perennial (zones 7-10)

14-20 days

2 years

Well-drained

Part shade to full sun

Root

12-36" apart

3 years

Growing Guide
GROWING NOTES
Licorice is a perennial native to the Mediterranean region that will grow taller and taller each year, eventually growing to 5' tall and showing pale white flowers.

 

Seed should be soaked for 2 hours, then stratified for for 3-4 weeks. To stratify place seeds onto one side of paper towel, moisten and fold over. Place bag into refrigerator for 3-4 weeks, checking periodically to ensure that towel remains moist. Any seeds that have started to germinate should be sown immediately.

 

Following stratification, all of seeds can be sown, or covered with a thin layer of soil, to a depth of approximately twice the thickness of the seed. Seeds should be started indoors, and kept moist, especially until seeds start to germinate and poke through the surface of the soil.

 

Licorice prefers full sun to part shade and well-drained soil.

MAINTAINING
Transplant after the final frost in spring once the plant has reached a height of 3-4" and show its first set of true leaves. An overcast or cloudy day is preferable.
 

 
   
     
   
 

Harvesting Guide
HARVESTING
Licorice roots require 3 years or so of growth to reach a good size for cultivation. Roots can be extracted with a garden spade, or by digging a hole or trench next to the plant and leveraging into the open space.

SAVING SEEDS

 
   
 
 

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