How to Grow Garlic Chives | Guide to Growing Garlic Chives

How to Grow Garlic Chives | Guide to Growing Garlic Chives  



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Great for dressing up potatoes and spicing up salads, this easy-to-grow Allium’s pinkish-lavender flowers make an attractive clump or edging in flower gardens.


Seeds or Seedlings

7 to 21 days, 45F to 95F

3 years

Low Fert., Damp, Acid, Droughty

Full Sun, Part Shade

6" to 9" apart

12" to 18" apart

42 to 50

Growing Guide
While chives will tolerate a wide range of soil conditions, they prefer slightly acid soil (pH 6.2 to 6.8) with moderate fertility and high organic matter.

Chinese and garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) are slightly less hardy, only to Zone 4 without extra winter protection.

Chinese and garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) grow up to 2 feet tall.

The common garden chive has pinkish lavender flowers. The cultivar ‘Forescate’ has rose red flowers. 'Corsica" and 'albiflorum' have white flowers. Chinese and garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) have white flowers.

Spreading clump of upright, grass-like leaves.

In spring or fall, direct seed onto well-prepared seedbed (covering very lightly), or transplant established plants. (If starting from seed, plants probably won’t be large enough to harvest for at least a year.)

Regular cutting helps keep plants vigorous and healthy and encourages spreading. Keep flowers picked to discourage dormancy in warm weather.

No fertilizer is needed if planted in reasonably fertile soil. Plants harvested frequently benefit from nitrogen top-dressing.

Divide and replant clump in fresh soil every three to five years.


Harvesting Guide
Pick chives any time during the growing season after the leaves are about 15 cm (6 inches) long. Pick only the leaves, as the flower stalks may be tough.

Harvest chives by hand, picking the leaves off at the base. Don't cut the leaves with scissors, as the resulting dieback has an unattractive brown edge.

Chives is best used fresh. Although the leaves can be frozen in ice cubes for later use, dried chives lack both color and flavor.
Pick chives flowers when they are just fully open.
Avoid harvesting garlic chives in the first year to enable the plant to develop a good root system. Thereafter, pick the leaves as required once they are about 15 cm (6 inches) long. Garlic chives leaves are very soft and quickly lose freshness. Like chives, they may be frozen, but should not be dried.

Pick the flower buds of garlic chives for fresh use or for drying. Flower stems are also edible.




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